The Images of Ashala

Posts tagged ‘ashala tylor photos’

Mama, the Klamath River Whale – Day 52 in River. 08/14/11

Ashala Tylor Photography

Mama's - the Klamath River Whale - pectoral fin

 

Mama appears to have injured her left pectoral fin.  She did not appear to be using it, as it was stationary against her side, while swimming.

She put on quite a show near sunset tonight with rainbow colors appearing whenever she would spout.

Ashala Tylor Photography

_MG_0459 Mama, the Klamath River Whale, Spouting Rainbows

Ashala Tylor Photography

MG_0460 Mama, the Klamath River Whale, Spouting Rainbows

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Mama Hit by Boat – Or Boat Hit by Mama, Klamath River Whale. Day 51 in River. 08/13/11

A boat has finally come to close to Mama.  I was wondering how long it would take for this incident to occur.  The boat got too close and when Mama came up she hit the boat.  Fortunately, none of the dogs on the boat were injured – innocent bystanders.  No, it was fortunate no one was injured, including the dogs.   Mama is 40 some feet long and who knows how many tons.  Gray whales weight 30-40 tons with a fluke of 10-12 feet across.  That can cause a lot of damage to boaters who do not adhere to the Federal regulations stating that a distance of 100 yards needs to be kept from a marine mammal.  Now, that is the length of a football field.   These people and other boaters and kayakers I witnessed today were way too close.   Someone is going to be injured if this keeps up.  Today the boaters were extremely lucky.  Yes, everyone wants close-up shots, but  the federal regulations are for the protection of both whales and humans.  By the way, there are stiff sanctions if prosecuted.

There were plenty of video cameras on the Klamath River Bridge today to record the incident.

Phone number to call to report incidents of harassment is NOAA:   800 853-1964.

Ashala Tylor Photography

_MG_9970- Boaters hit by Mama, the Klamath River Whale

 

 

 

On a lighter side, Mama was full of energy today and swimming around and rolling to the delight of all the onlookers on the bridge.

 

Ashala Tylor Photography

_MG_0027 - Mama, the Klamath River Whale, Spouting

Mamma headed for her favorite rolling and/or eating place

Many more images of these beautiful mammals can be seen at http://www.flickr.com/photos/ashala
For purchase or use of any photos:  ashala7@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Mama, the Klamath River Whale, Marks 50th Day in River Today 08/12/11

Ashala Tylor Photography

The Klamath River Where Mama, the Klamath River Whale, Resides

 

View of the Klamath River looking downstream where the Klamath River RV Park is on the left, a place Mama called home for a month.  She can still be seen from the RV Park, to the campers’ delight.  There is a nominal day fee charged for those who just want to sit and watch Mama spouting.  They also have tent camping right on the river.  707 482-2091.

Today was rather uneventful.  Mama was not moving too fast today, unlike yesterday.  Maybe she was tired from the show she put on for everyone with her rolling and spouting yesterday.  The crowds were still there.  The Highway Patrol reported a boat getting too close to the whale.  Anyone can help by calling the Hotline at NOAA.  800 853-1964 if you see any form of harassment while viewing Mama.  Remember, there is a 100 yard distance regulation from marine mammals.  This applies to everyone, including kayakers and tour boats.

Ashala Tylor Photography

Mama's, the Klamath River Whale, Blow Holes Open

 

 

Ashala Tylor Photography

Mama's, the Klamath River Whale, Blow Holes Closed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Following excerpt from:  http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/whales/anatomy/Blowhole.shtml

Whales are mammals who breathe air into their lungs. Blowholes are a whale’s nostrils and are located on the top or back of the whale’s head. Blowholes are covered by muscular flaps that keep water from entering them when the whale is under water. In the relaxed state, the flap covers the blowhole. A blowhole leads to the whale’s trachea and then to its lungs. Unlike us, whales cannot breathe through their mouth; they only breathe throught their blowholes. 

Baleen whales (like humpbacks, blue whales, gray whales, bowhead whales, etc.) have two blowholes, located side by side. Toothed whales (like sperm whales, beluga whales, dolphins, etc.) have one blowhole.

“At the surface of the water, whales open their blowhole(s) and exhale air explosively through their blowhole. This exhaled air from the blowhole is called the blow and usually forms a gusher or a bushy stream of misty air and vapor. This is immediately followed by inhalation of fresh air, and the blowhole(s) close again. (Blowholes are in a closed position when the whale relaxes.) This breathing pattern takes only a fraction of a second for small cetaceans (dolphins and porpoises), but it may take a few seconds for larger whales.

Just before a whale dives underwater, strong muscles surrounding the blowhole relax and the protective flap covers the blowhole.
Whales cannot breathe through through their mouths (like people can). Their trachea (the tube to the lungs) and esophagus (the tube to the stomach) are not connected.”

Many more images of these beautiful mammals can be seen at http://www.flickr.com/photos/ashala.
For purchase or use of any photos:  ashala7@gmail.com

Mama, the Klamath River Whale, in River 49 Days 08/11/11

Ashala Tylor Photography

Mama, Klamath River Whale, Rolling in the Klamath River

 

Mama delighted the crowd that gathered today on the bridge with quite a bit of rolling and swimming upriver and back to the bridge numerous times.   She was full of energy today as opposed to her usual slow circles beneath the Klamath River Bridge.

Ashala Tylor Images

A Man and his Son Wading Out to Watch Mama, the Klamath River Whale

Ashala Tylor Images

A Man Wading with his Son Watching Mama, the Klamath River Whale

 

 

 

 

 

It is important to remember that the Marine Mammal Protection Act regulation states that individuals should be 100 yards from a marine mammal.  Many people are not adhering to that regulation, including boats in the Klamath River.

Anyone seeing harassing behavior can call NOAA Law Enforcement and report it.  The number is: 800 853-1964.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OTHER KLAMATH NEWS:   The Salmon Festival is happening on Saturday, August 20th.  It is put on by the Yurok Tribe.  I have included a link to their site.   You can visit Mama when you come to the Salmon Festival.

http://www.klamathcc.org/home.cfm?dir_cat=37896

Many images of these beautiful mammals can be seen at http://www.flickr.com/photos/ashala.

For purchase or use of any photos please email me:  ashala7@gmail.com

Mama, the Klamath River Whale, Swimming in River 48 Days, 8/10/11

Ashala Tylor Photography

Mama, the Klamath River Whale, Spouting Rainbows

Friday will mark 50 days in the river.   This beautiful gray whale is still swimming circles beneath the bridge, cars are still stopping and asking,  “What is down there?”   “A whale?  You are kidding.”  Highway Patrol is parked at both ends of the bridge and  miles before the bridge in either direction highway warning signs are flashing a warning of bridge pedestrians.    The river is getting lower.   In the image below, kayakers were standing in chest high water next to their kayak.

All in all, it was a rather uneventful day in the life of the cetacean who seems to call the bridge area home.   She swims in circles continually, sometimes moving to the other side of the bridge to roll.  No one is sure what she is doing – scratching?  feeding?      Nothing is known for sure except there is a 45- foot gray whale in the river who does not appear to have any intention of leaving any time soon.  No clanging of pipes, powerful water blasts, orca whale sounds,  Yurok singing and drumming, music from a violin, a flute, a ukelele, or prayers from a paddle boarder can convince her the ocean is where she should be at the present time.

Maybe, just maybe, she knows more than we know about why and where she wants to be.

Ashala Tylor Photography

Mama, the Klamath River Whale, Spouting Beneath The Klamath River Bridge

Ashala Tylor Photography

Onlookers watching Mama, the Klamath River Whale, in the Klamath River Below

Ashala Tylor Photography

Kayakers Near Mama, the Klamath River Whale, in the Klamath River

 

 

Many images of these beautiful mammals can be seen at http://www.flickr.com/photos/ashala.

For purchase or use of any photos:  ashala7@gmail.com

 

 

 

Day 45 in the River for Mama, the Klamath River Whale – Daily Whale Update 8-7-11

Nothing new to report today, Sunday, other than throngs of people on the bridge, although not as crowded as usual.   Mama (which is preferred over whale #604) is still swimming in circles under the bridge entertaining young and old alike who venture on the narrow bridge for a look down into the Klamath River to view the Gentle Giant.

Since Mama and her calf were first sighted in the river on June 23rd, 45 days have now passed and she shows no signs of venturing back to the ocean.  The calf has now been gone for 15 days.

Since some blog readers have never seen the calf or known the calf existed, I decided to post some images of the youngster.

Ashala Tylor Images

Mama and Calf in Klamath River

Ashala Tylor Images

Mama Spy Hopping - July 7, 2011

The barnacles Mama had on arrival

have almost disappeared.

Ashala Tylor Images

Young Calf with Mama

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More images can be seen at:  www.flickr.com/photos/ashala

For photo purchases:  ashala7@gmail.com

TO VIEW IMAGE IN FULL SIZE, CLICK ON IMAGE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to Capture Whale Breath from Mama, The Klamath River Whale – Update

Ashala Tylor Images

Capturing Breath Sample from Mama, the Klamath River Whale

Researchers from Davis University were in Klamath this week to capture VOC samples in a bag, volatile organic compounds – which translates to whale breath – to take back to their Davis lab to analyze.   Once it is captured from the whale, via hanging out over the boat with the bag extended from a long flexible pole somewhere in the vicinity of her two blow holes, they bring it back to shore, race it up to an area where they can put it into a trap to convert into a stable form to transport.   It is a form of profiling the health of the whale and used as a diagnostic tool.  To date, no one has analyzed whale breath before.

According to William Cheung, PhD., “It is a non-invasive, non-stress health profiling diagnostic tool.  We can get a baseline and see if it is stable.  If it is shifting, it could be a cause for concern.”

Ashala Tylor Images

Breath Capture from Mama, the Klamath River Whale

Ashala Tylor Images

Return with the VOC Samples from Mama, the Klamath River Whale

Ashala Tylor Images William Cheung, PhD., Running with the  VOC sample.

Ashala Tylor Images

William Cheung, PhD.(right) with Phil Louie, His Assistant

More images can be seen at:  www.flickr.com/photos/ashala

For photo purchases:  ashala7@gmail.com

TO VIEW IMAGE IN FULL SIZE, CLICK ON IMAGE.

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