The Images of Ashala

Posts tagged ‘river whale’

Mama, the Klamath River Whale, Made a Difference in Someone’s Life

For use of any images or purchase, visit my website: http://www.ashalaTylor.com

To view images in this post full size, click on the image.

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I received an email last week and was granted permission to use it in my blog, but the writer requested I not include her name as some family members do not know the gentleman’s condition presently.   When I read this particular email, it touched me profoundly and wanted to share it.   I wonder how many people Mama touched that we will never know about.  The gentleman in the email was just driving down the highway when he saw Mama.  Here is the email I received:

“My younger brother and the love of his life went out west. After being gone for eighteen days, my brother Wayne told Lisa that the one thing he would love to do was go whale watching.  They realized it would take four more days of driving to go whale watching, so they decided to head home. As they crossed the bridge over Klamath River they noticed a crowd had gathered. They got out of their car to see what was going on. Much to their amazement there was the great whale in the river. My brother had recently learned he only has a few months to live because of esophagus and stomach cancer. As Wayne watched the whale he turned to Lisa with these words, “This whale is here for me!”

Lisa told us this story with tears in her eyes last evening.   Someone ask if she found out what happened to the whale.  She said I did not want to know. I looked on line to find out for myself and came upon your photos and stories. I can tell from your photos and words you have a kind and sensitive heart and thought you would like to hear my brother’s story of the Klamath River Whale.  It is going to be so hard to watch my brother die.
God bless you!”
ashalaTylor.com

_MG_7913-1 Mama, The Klamath River Whale, Blowing a Heart

Mama, The Klamath River Whale, Featured in National Geographic

Mama, the Klamath River Whale, is still making headlines and her memory is being kept alive.   The image of Mama and Seth, the paddle boarder hoping to lead her back to the ocean, that has made its way all around the net was featured on National Geographic’s “Pictures We Love – Best of August.”  Over 7,100 people have “liked” it as of this posting.   See link below to view it:

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/08/pictures/110831-best-news-pictures-national-geographic-we-love-august-2011-whale-libya-hurricane-irene-somalia/#/pictures-we-love-august-2011-whale-paddle-boarder_39846_600x450.jpg

AshalaTylor.com

_MG_0163A - Paddle Boarder Serenading Mama, the Klamath River Whale

For use or purchase of this image and many other images, please visit http://www.ashalaTylor.com

 

A Lesson From the Gentle Giant – Stay True to Your Path

Many times in life what we do has far-reaching effects that we may never know.   Here is something written for the internet in regard to Mama, the Klamath River whale, and staying true to oneself.  It is used by permission of the author, Andee Allen, from California, written for morningcoach.com/blog.   Here is a direct link to the article which is reproduced here on this blog: http://blog.morningcoach.com/2011/08/12/journey-distractions/

“JOURNEY DISTRACTIONS

Okay, Morning Coach people, you think you have issues meeting your goals?  Check out the saga of the Klamath River whales.  Here is this mother and baby Pacific gray whale gently swimming in the Klamath River, minding their own business, doing their own thing.  After about a month, the baby heads back to the open ocean.  The mother, content on her own journey, continues to leisurely swim around in circles in the river.

whale diversionJPGThen out of no-where come these smart, super-intelligent, caring citizens who decide that the mother should not be in the river, that what she is doing is not right and that she has to go back to the ocean right now.   So in their infinite, all-knowing wisdom, they shoot her with water, bang on pipes, pound on drums, etc. in an effort to change her course and send her back to where they think she should be.whale spraying

The gentle giant calmly ignores them and goes on about her own personal development and goals.  She does not let them divert her focus or attention.  She continues to swim in the river – up the river, under the bridge, and back down the river.  Every day, consistently.  Not once does she lash out at the people that think they know what is best for her. No angry splashing, no overturning their boats, just a gentle steady progress on her route.  In fact, mostly she ignores them.   She doesn’t try to argue with them or dissuade them from their goals of diverting her.  Instead she let’s them do what they are doing and gracefully continues on her own personal journey.

Now I don’t pretend to understand what she is doing in that river anymore than I understand what you are doing in your own personal river.  But this I do know, whatever she is doing or whatever you are doing, it’s because it is the right journey for your own personal growth and development.  It doesn’t really matter if others understand or embrace your personal goals.  What matters is that you – like the whale – understand your journey  and consistently work towards it.

Next time you have friends, family, acquaintances, or even strangers trying to divert you from your journey, think of the whale – stay the course, be consistent, be gentle and courteous, and stay focused on your own personal goal.  Let nothing distract you.

personal goal

To follow more of this beautiful whale’s journey and/or purchase images go to  www.ashalatylor.com or http://www.flickr.com/photos/ashala

Andee is a business consultant whose passion is helping business owners strategically market and brand their companies using social media tools coupled with traditional business tactics.  Her clients range from small independent companies to large multi-national organizations.  She has an MBA but owes her success to personal coaching by JB Glossinger and morningcoach.com.  She can be reached at andeeallen@gmail.com.

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This entry was posted on Friday, August 12th, 2011 at 7:32 pm and is filed under Goal SettingPersonal Development. You can follow any responses to this entry through theRSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.


RIP Mama, the Klamath River Whale. Day 54 in the River, 8-16-11

As many of you might know, Mama, our Klamath River Whale, passed away at 4:19 a.m. this morning.  Those with her said she went very peacefully and beautifully and were by her side in a boat when she drew her last breath.

After my post last nite requesting prayers for her as she was stranded in the sand, I was amazed when I heard her  by the bridge spouting and not in front of the Klamath River RV Park where I last saw her  stranded.   According to sources there, she was freed from the sand when the tide came up  and, with a little help, was able to swim freely again.  I made my way  to an area past the bridge about 1:30 a.m. and found her swimming in the area she liked past the bridge upriver.  She swam there for a long time.  In retrospect, it was my opportunity to say my last goodbye to her.  I then made my way back to Klamath River RV Park and found she had returned there.  After listening to her and seeing spouts, I was going to post at 3 a.m. that she was back swimming and doing fine.   Thinking it was late and I would post in the morning, I went to bed.  I was shocked this morning when I awoke to see her lifeless body in the river.

Today was a very long and sad day as this beautiful being I had come to know and love has left us.  What her message was, we may never know.  Why she was here, we may never know.  There are so many things we don’t know and are not meant to know.  But what I do know is she was truly a “gentle” giant, a loving creature who charmed and mesmerized the throngs of  people, young and old, who came to watch her from atop the bridge, from the water, from the shoreline.

Mama, the gentle Klamath River Whale, we will so miss you and we thank you for gracing our lives with your presence.

RIP, MAMA.

Many more images of these beautiful mammals can be seen at http://www.flickr.com/photos/ashala
For purchase or use of any photos:  ashala7@gmail.com

Ashala Tylor Photography

MG_0843 Mama, the Klamath River Whale, at 8 pm Last Night

Ashala Tylor Photography

_MG_0909 Mama, the Klamath River Whale, This Morning

Ashala Tylor Photography

_MG_0862 Mama, the Klamath River Whale, This Morning

Mama, the Klamath River Whale – Day 52 in River. 08/14/11

Ashala Tylor Photography

Mama's - the Klamath River Whale - pectoral fin

 

Mama appears to have injured her left pectoral fin.  She did not appear to be using it, as it was stationary against her side, while swimming.

She put on quite a show near sunset tonight with rainbow colors appearing whenever she would spout.

Ashala Tylor Photography

_MG_0459 Mama, the Klamath River Whale, Spouting Rainbows

Ashala Tylor Photography

MG_0460 Mama, the Klamath River Whale, Spouting Rainbows

Mama Hit by Boat – Or Boat Hit by Mama, Klamath River Whale. Day 51 in River. 08/13/11

A boat has finally come to close to Mama.  I was wondering how long it would take for this incident to occur.  The boat got too close and when Mama came up she hit the boat.  Fortunately, none of the dogs on the boat were injured – innocent bystanders.  No, it was fortunate no one was injured, including the dogs.   Mama is 40 some feet long and who knows how many tons.  Gray whales weight 30-40 tons with a fluke of 10-12 feet across.  That can cause a lot of damage to boaters who do not adhere to the Federal regulations stating that a distance of 100 yards needs to be kept from a marine mammal.  Now, that is the length of a football field.   These people and other boaters and kayakers I witnessed today were way too close.   Someone is going to be injured if this keeps up.  Today the boaters were extremely lucky.  Yes, everyone wants close-up shots, but  the federal regulations are for the protection of both whales and humans.  By the way, there are stiff sanctions if prosecuted.

There were plenty of video cameras on the Klamath River Bridge today to record the incident.

Phone number to call to report incidents of harassment is NOAA:   800 853-1964.

Ashala Tylor Photography

_MG_9970- Boaters hit by Mama, the Klamath River Whale

 

 

 

On a lighter side, Mama was full of energy today and swimming around and rolling to the delight of all the onlookers on the bridge.

 

Ashala Tylor Photography

_MG_0027 - Mama, the Klamath River Whale, Spouting

Mamma headed for her favorite rolling and/or eating place

Many more images of these beautiful mammals can be seen at http://www.flickr.com/photos/ashala
For purchase or use of any photos:  ashala7@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Mama, the Klamath River Whale, in River 49 Days 08/11/11

Ashala Tylor Photography

Mama, Klamath River Whale, Rolling in the Klamath River

 

Mama delighted the crowd that gathered today on the bridge with quite a bit of rolling and swimming upriver and back to the bridge numerous times.   She was full of energy today as opposed to her usual slow circles beneath the Klamath River Bridge.

Ashala Tylor Images

A Man and his Son Wading Out to Watch Mama, the Klamath River Whale

Ashala Tylor Images

A Man Wading with his Son Watching Mama, the Klamath River Whale

 

 

 

 

 

It is important to remember that the Marine Mammal Protection Act regulation states that individuals should be 100 yards from a marine mammal.  Many people are not adhering to that regulation, including boats in the Klamath River.

Anyone seeing harassing behavior can call NOAA Law Enforcement and report it.  The number is: 800 853-1964.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OTHER KLAMATH NEWS:   The Salmon Festival is happening on Saturday, August 20th.  It is put on by the Yurok Tribe.  I have included a link to their site.   You can visit Mama when you come to the Salmon Festival.

http://www.klamathcc.org/home.cfm?dir_cat=37896

Many images of these beautiful mammals can be seen at http://www.flickr.com/photos/ashala.

For purchase or use of any photos please email me:  ashala7@gmail.com

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